SLA duration

You can select one of two SLA duration types to define the length of time within which a task must be completed before the SLA is breached. If an SLA schedule is defined, the duration works along with the schedule. In user-specific duration, you can choose to specify the length of time an SLA must run before it is marked as breached. Relative durations specify durations relative to the start time of the task SLA and are defined using a script.

When you define an SLA, you can select either a user specified duration or a relative duration.
User specified duration
Specifies a static duration period, such as 8 hours, along with a business schedule. The Duration field displays enabling you to specify the length of time in days, hours, minutes, and seconds the SLA must run before it is marked as breached. The number of days specified in the Duration field are converted to 24 hour blocks.

Each time you set a duration, an example breach time information message displays at the top of the form. This will assist you in understanding how the breach date is calculated. For example, if the current date is January 1, 2015, time is 10:30 am, and the duration is set to 10 hours and no schedule has been selected, then the following information message displays: An SLA starting now will end breach on 2015-01-01 20:30 (Actual elapsed time: 10 Hours).

Relative duration
Specifies a duration relative to the start time of the task SLA and is defined using a script. For example, you can select a relative duration such as Breach on Due Date, End of next business day or Next business day by 4pm. The set of relative durations are defined in the core configuration using script-based duration calculations.
Note: Pause conditions are not compatible with relative durations.
You can use relative duration within service level management in the following ways:
  • Specify a relative duration.
  • Relative duration usage scenarios.
Specify a relative duration
To specify a relative duration, select an option such as Next business day by 4pm or End of next business day from the list of available relative durations in the Duration type field.
When you select a relative duration such as Next business day by 4pm, the Relative duration works on field appears. You can specify the record against which the relative duration should be calculated. You can select to use Task record or SLA record and the one you select is available as current for the relative duration script.
Note: If relative duration is selected, the example breach date information message is not displayed.

If your task record has a target date and time field, you can create an SLA with a relative duration based on that field.

Relative duration usage scenarios
If a schedule is selected in the SLA definition, the SLA duration works with the SLA schedule. For example, an SLA might have a user-specified duration of 16 hours with the schedule as 8-5 weekdays. If this SLA starts to run for a task at 8:00, then it breaches at 17:00. The breach time is calculated from the schedule that defines working time as eight hours per day from Monday to Friday. So the 16-hours duration equates to two days later in the schedule.

The Breach on Due Date sets the breach time of the SLA to the date and time from the Due Date field of the task to which the SLA is attached to.

If the Due Date field is empty or in the past, then the breach time of the task SLA is calculated to be one second ahead of the task SLA start time. If the date and time in the Due Date field is outside the schedule for the task SLA, then the breach time is set to the next available scheduled time. For example, if the SLA Definition specifies a task SLA schedule as 08:00-17:00 and the value in the Due Date field is Wednesday 11th Jan 2017 20:30, then the breach time is set to Thursday 12th 2017 Jan 08:00.

If your task record has a target date and time field, you can create an SLA with a relative duration based on that field.