Service Mapping discovery flow

Service Mapping collects data about devices and applications used in business services in your organization. It then creates a map of business services and stores the collected data in the CMDB.

In Service Mapping, devices and applications are referred to as configuration items (CIs).

Service Mapping uses patterns to discover and map CIs. A pattern is a sequence of algorithms whose purpose is to establish parameters of a CI and its outbound connections. A typical Service Mapping pattern consists of two types of algorithms for:
  • identifying CIs
  • finding CI connections

The starting point of any discovery process is an entry point. An entry point is a property of a connection to an application configuration item (CI). For example, to map your electronic mailing business service, define an email address. The discovery and mapping process begins from Discovery performing the horizontal discovery to identify the host. Once the host discovery is complete, Service Mapping starts the top-down discovery to find and map applications running on this host.

Service Mapping uses MID Servers to communicate with CIs in your organization. MID Servers are located inside your organization network and Service Mapping can communicate with them without traversing firewalls.

The discovery and mapping process consists of the following interactions:
  1. A user defines an entry point for an application CI.
  2. The device hosting the application is identified:
    1. Service Mapping checks if the device hosting this application CI exists in CMDB.
    2. If not, Service Mapping triggers Discovery to perform host detection.


    3. Discovery creates the first set of probes for port discovery (Shazzam) and places them as a discovery request in the External Communication Channel (ECC) queue.
    4. The MID Server checks the ECC queue and retrieves the discovery request assigned to it.
    5. The MID Server runs the probes against the host and discovers open ports.
    6. The MID Server passes information on the host ports to the ECC queue.
    7. Discovery checks the ECC queue and receives information on the host ports.


    8. These steps are repeated for other types of probes: classification, identification, and exploration.
    9. Discovery adds the host to CMDB.
    10. During the host discovery using probes, Service Mapping checks the ECC queue if this process is complete. When the host discovery is complete, Service Mapping checks whether this host exists in CMDB.
  3. Once the host is found in CMDB, Service Mapping discovers the application running on this host:
    1. Service Mapping creates an application discovery request for the IP address of the entry point. It then writes the request in the ECC queue and assigns a MID Server to the request.
    2. The MID Server checks the ECC queue and retrieves the discovery request assigned to it.
    3. The MID Server starts running identification sections of the pattern to find the match for the entry point. When the identification section matches the entry point, the pattern discovers a CI.
    4. The MID Server starts running connectivity sections of the pattern to find outgoing connections of the newly discovered CI.
    5. The MID Server passes information on the discovered CI, its attributes, and connections to the ECC queue.
    6. Service Mapping checks the ECC queue and receives information on the newly discovered CI.
    7. Service Mapping writes the information into the CMDB and adds this CI to the business service map.
    8. Service Mapping creates the discovery requests for all applications to which the newly discovered CI connects. Mapping is complete after Service Mapping maps a CI that does not have any outbound connections or is marked as a boundary.